All posts by Richard Hughes

About Richard Hughes

As BroadVision's Director of Social Strategy, Richard helps organizations plan their social business strategies. His personal blog on social business is enterprisinglysocial.com

Collaborative Processes

Whereas the structured, predictable element of a business process is increasingly automated, exception handling continues to be where human knowledge and intelligence needs to be applied to resolve a problem.

Read Transcript

In an ideal world, all the processes that power our businesses would be neatly defined and predictable with provision made for everything that could go wrong.

Of course, in the real world, there’s always something that can go wrong that you didn’t expect. Whereas the structured, predictable element of a business process is increasingly automated, exception handling continues to be where human knowledge and intelligence needs to be applied to resolve a problem.

But all too often, this exception handling is a chaotic mess of email conversations. Attempts to bring structure to this person-to-person interaction often results in both front- and back-office processes becoming too rigid, frustrating employees and customers alike when the inevitable “the system won’t let me do that” situation arises.

Let’s take the simple example of a consulting company agreeing a change request with their customer.

While steps 2, 4 and 5 of the process are individual approval actions, steps 1 and 3 are likely to involve a several people working together.

Without the collaboration in the process, the change request won’t get a sufficiently thorough review, and time may be wasted further down the line when overlooked details become apparent.

Without the structure in the process, the collaboration could lose direction and fail to come to a final conclusion.

Of course, countless variations on this example are happening every day. From simple document reviews, to field service engineers resolving issues at customer sites. From customer service departments handling complaints, to operations teams working to restore service after automatically-triggered downtime alerts – almost every organisation in the world has a set of processes that are too unstructured to be modelled rigidly in traditional Business Process Management tools, but too important to be left to email. We call these collaborative processes; they can also be characterized as people-intensive, decision-centric, knowledge-based processes.

And even as our business processes become more automated, the need for structured collaboration is not going to diminish, merely change. Over the next few years, collaborative processes triggered by Internet-of-Things-connected sensors will become just as common as the examples we see today.

Vmoso Process management introduces structure, discipline and accountability to collaboration.

Process flows can be started from a list of pre-prepared templates for your organisation, or created from scratch to suit the specific task in hand.

Throughout the process, there’s always a  clear indication of who’s responsible for completing the current step, but the assignee can always call on Vmoso’s collaboration features to access the expertise of their co-workers. And of course, all participants can see all the discussion so far, ensuring they have the information they need to complete the task, and a clear audit trail.

For more information, visit broadvision.com/process-management

Vmoso Knowledge Maps

As organizations embark on digital transformation projects, it is essential that everyone can quickly gain access to the information they need, and can share new knowledge efficiently with the rest of the company. The Galaxy Corporation use Vmoso to capture, retain and organize their collective knowledge.

Why Knowledge Management Matters More Than Ever

In the early 2000s, everyone was talking about “knowledge management”. But over the years, it has been attracting less and less attention.

This seems strange, because knowledge management matters more than ever. Here are five reasons why…

Read Transcript

Business is Digital
The last decade has seen more and more of our communication, information and transactions moved online. Now, many organisations are embarking on major digital transformation projects to accelerate that. With the physical filing cabinet becoming increasingly obsolete, the need for better management of digital knowledge is obvious.

Business is Mobile
The mobile revolution has meant that more and more people are working away from the office. But they still need access to the collective intelligence of the company, wherever they are, and whatever device their using.

Business is Global
Whether it’s co-workers, customers, business partners or suppliers, more and more organisations work with people distributed around the world. Waiting 8 hours for someone on the other side of the world to start their working day and answer your question is inefficient and frustrating, so global companies need to organize their knowledge to make it available, whichever time zone you’re in.

Business is Continuous
Employee turnover is fact of life, but far too many organisations lose valuable knowledge when the employee leaves. Capturing that knowledge as it’s created enables seamless transition for new employees and prevents corporate amnesia.

Business is Regulated
For companies in some industries, this retention of knowledge and communication isn’t just a nice-to-have – it’s a legal necessity. It’s essential to report accurately who said what to whom, when, and see this in the context of steps leading to key decisions or transactions.

Vmoso
Vmoso preserves knowledge by capturing it at source. Every message you send, and every file you attach immediately form part of the ever-growing collective knowledge base, and is connected to all other referenced information. So when you, your co-worker or your successor needs to go back and find the information later, Vmoso has it ready and waiting.