All posts by Richard Hughes

About Richard Hughes

As Director of Digital Strategy at BroadVision, Richard Hughes brings extensive experience of understanding the way people work and how to apply pragmatic solutions to the communication problems faced by today’s organisations and their workforces. Combining visionary thinking with a firm grasp on reality, Richard specialises in developing and writing thought-leadership pieces on the key topics of the social enterprise, digital transformation and knowledge management.

His experience on these subjects makes him a sought-after speaker at events as well as an advisor to corporations regarding strategies towards better management of the wealth of internal knowledge often hidden in an organisation, as well as better engagement of employees, customers and partners.

Collaborative Processes

Whereas the structured, predictable element of a business process is increasingly automated, exception handling continues to be where human knowledge and intelligence needs to be applied to resolve a problem.

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In an ideal world, all the processes that power our businesses would be neatly defined and predictable with provision made for everything that could go wrong.

Of course, in the real world, there’s always something that can go wrong that you didn’t expect. Whereas the structured, predictable element of a business process is increasingly automated, exception handling continues to be where human knowledge and intelligence needs to be applied to resolve a problem.

But all too often, this exception handling is a chaotic mess of email conversations. Attempts to bring structure to this person-to-person interaction often results in both front- and back-office processes becoming too rigid, frustrating employees and customers alike when the inevitable “the system won’t let me do that” situation arises.

Let’s take the simple example of a consulting company agreeing a change request with their customer.

While steps 2, 4 and 5 of the process are individual approval actions, steps 1 and 3 are likely to involve a several people working together.

Without the collaboration in the process, the change request won’t get a sufficiently thorough review, and time may be wasted further down the line when overlooked details become apparent.

Without the structure in the process, the collaboration could lose direction and fail to come to a final conclusion.

Of course, countless variations on this example are happening every day. From simple document reviews, to field service engineers resolving issues at customer sites. From customer service departments handling complaints, to operations teams working to restore service after automatically-triggered downtime alerts – almost every organisation in the world has a set of processes that are too unstructured to be modelled rigidly in traditional Business Process Management tools, but too important to be left to email. We call these collaborative processes; they can also be characterized as people-intensive, decision-centric, knowledge-based processes.

And even as our business processes become more automated, the need for structured collaboration is not going to diminish, merely change. Over the next few years, collaborative processes triggered by Internet-of-Things-connected sensors will become just as common as the examples we see today.

Vmoso Process management introduces structure, discipline and accountability to collaboration.

Process flows can be started from a list of pre-prepared templates for your organisation, or created from scratch to suit the specific task in hand.

Throughout the process, there’s always a  clear indication of who’s responsible for completing the current step, but the assignee can always call on Vmoso’s collaboration features to access the expertise of their co-workers. And of course, all participants can see all the discussion so far, ensuring they have the information they need to complete the task, and a clear audit trail.

For more information, visit broadvision.com/process-management

Galaxytown Police Department

Captain Lombard of the Galaxytown Police Department has a wide range of responsibilities. His daily duties include everything from overseeing budgets, officers under his command, investigations, internal department matters, attending community events for awareness and reporting to city council members.

He’s been struggling lately with cases taking longer to close. It’s difficult to organize, retrieve and retain information and activities on cases due to the multiplicity of difference sources – files, email, chat tools, CRM, and content sharing applications.

This is even more challenging given the need to access the information in the street, not only from behind a desk.

Captain Lombard has noticed recently that because of the proliferation of communication channels and the lack of centralized way to track and organize them, several cases and activities have been falling through the cracks. This has impacted the image of the department and hindered the resolution of the cases.

In an attempt to address the situation, Captain Lombard has recently approved the procurement of Vmoso for his entire department.

This morning, Captain Lombard receives details of a major robbery at a large electronics store. With everything on his plate and emails piling up in his inbox, Lombard decides to use Vmoso to manage his duties and keep everything in one place.

Instead of parsing hundreds of daily emails, now with Vmoso Lombard only has to review a few folders where all his communication is automatically organized and classified. It makes it easy for him to rapidly review cases as they come to his attention. In addition, any assignment made can be easily tracked and documented.

As Lombard reviews the case he uses the Vmoso knowledge map to explore all the connections between cases, and discovers a lot of information he wouldn’t have been aware of without Vmoso.

He identifies a possible tie between this case and another one handled by Detective Peters. Lombard uses Vmoso to assign the case to Peters, and with a single click he includes all the pertinent information.

Peters is working the case and finds evidence at the crime scene that could be vital. Using Vmoso he updates the task to inform the Chief on progress he’s made.

Peters also creates a task for the Forensics department to work on the evidence gathered at the crime scene.

Documents and reports provided from Forensics can be continuously updated with any new findings, so Peters always has access to the most up to date information, even if he’s out of the office.

Once they are finished, Forensics then update the task notifying Peters of their findings.

Peters receives the notification on his cell phone while working in the field, and he can keep his Captain up to date from wherever he is.

The Chief decides to use the knowledge map in Vmoso to see if there are any current or past cases that are similar to Peters’ case. He can easily see previous cases that were worked on and that had success with certain strategies, making it easier for him to find and obtain intelligence or strategic insight.

The Chief finds that one of the suspects lives in the Newtown, 20 miles away. He instructs Peters to reach out and coordinate the arrest with the Newtown Police Department. This entire communication happens on the go, using their mobile devices.

Peters receives vital information from the Newtown detective about the suspect, as well as information on his movements and history.

Newtown PD is not on Vmoso and uses email to communicate with Galaxytown PD. But thanks to Vmoso’s email integration, all the communication with Newtown PD is received and automatically classified and, saving valuable time.

While working on the case, Peters uncovers that the suspects have ties to an international terrorist group that have bombed local cities. He responds to his task to let the Chief know about his findings.

The Chief decides to create a post for the Galaxy Intelligence Agency, notifying them about a possible terrorist threat.

With minimal effort, a huge amount of information stored in files, images, videos, email and chats are shared. This information is stored in a highly secure space with very strict content access.

With the information gathered by the police department and intelligence agency the Captain and Detective Peters are able to close the case.

Using Vmoso enables the Galaxytown Police Department to close cases faster. Vmoso captures, organizes and retrieves information from any device as a single source of truth. Updates on cases and tasks can be viewed from anywhere, at any time with instant notification, thus increasing efficiency and saving time.

With Vmoso, orders never fall through the cracks and information is never lost. Vmoso enhances collaboration with external agencies and communication with the public community to better protect and serve its citizens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vmoso Knowledge Maps

As organizations embark on digital transformation projects, it is essential that everyone can quickly gain access to the information they need, and can share new knowledge efficiently with the rest of the company. The Galaxy Corporation use Vmoso to capture, retain and organize their collective knowledge.

Why Knowledge Management Matters More Than Ever

In the early 2000s, everyone was talking about “knowledge management”. But over the years, it has been attracting less and less attention.

This seems strange, because knowledge management matters more than ever. Here are five reasons why…

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Business is Digital
The last decade has seen more and more of our communication, information and transactions moved online. Now, many organisations are embarking on major digital transformation projects to accelerate that. With the physical filing cabinet becoming increasingly obsolete, the need for better management of digital knowledge is obvious.

Business is Mobile
The mobile revolution has meant that more and more people are working away from the office. But they still need access to the collective intelligence of the company, wherever they are, and whatever device their using.

Business is Global
Whether it’s co-workers, customers, business partners or suppliers, more and more organisations work with people distributed around the world. Waiting 8 hours for someone on the other side of the world to start their working day and answer your question is inefficient and frustrating, so global companies need to organize their knowledge to make it available, whichever time zone you’re in.

Business is Continuous
Employee turnover is fact of life, but far too many organisations lose valuable knowledge when the employee leaves. Capturing that knowledge as it’s created enables seamless transition for new employees and prevents corporate amnesia.

Business is Regulated
For companies in some industries, this retention of knowledge and communication isn’t just a nice-to-have – it’s a legal necessity. It’s essential to report accurately who said what to whom, when, and see this in the context of steps leading to key decisions or transactions.

Vmoso
Vmoso preserves knowledge by capturing it at source. Every message you send, and every file you attach immediately form part of the ever-growing collective knowledge base, and is connected to all other referenced information. So when you, your co-worker or your successor needs to go back and find the information later, Vmoso has it ready and waiting.